Design and Technology

Intent

Design and Technology is an inspiring, rigorous, and practical subject. We want to encourage children to learn to think and intervene creatively to solve problems both as individuals and as members of a team. We encourage children to use their creativity and imagination, to design and make products that solve real and relevant problems, within a variety of contexts considering their own and others’ needs, wants, and values.

All teaching of Design and technology should follow the design, make and evaluate cycle where each of these stages should be given equal weight. There should be evidence of each of these stages in the Design and technology books, which should also develop to show clear progression across the key stages as they pass up through each year group.

Evaluation is an integral part of the design process and allows children to adapt and improve their product, this is a key skill which they need throughout their life. D&T allows children to apply the knowledge and skills learned in other subjects, particularly Maths, Science and Art. Children’s interests are captured through theme learning, ensuring that links are made in a cross curricular way, giving children motivation and meaning for their learning.

In line with the National Curriculum: Design and Technology programmes of study, we aim to plan inspiring and enriching learning specifically for a purpose by:

• Designing purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria.

• Select from and use a wide range of materials and components.

• Explore and evaluate a range of existing products.

• Build structures, exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable.

Progression booklets have been produced to enable children and staff to plan their curriculum with progression in mind. They will be used to recap prior learning, explain the new learning and give an insight into where this learning will take them.

Through the Design and Technology curriculum, children should be inspired by engineers, designers, chefs and architects to enable them to create a range of structures, mechanisms, textiles, electrical systems and food products with a real-life purpose.

Implementation

All teaching of DT should follow the design, make and evaluate cycle. Each stage should be rooted in technical knowledge.  The design process should be rooted in real life, relevant contexts to give meaning to learning. While making, children should be given choice and a range of tools to choose freely from. To evaluate, children should be able to evaluate their own products against a design criteria. Each of these steps should be rooted in technical knowledge and vocabulary. DT should be taught to a high standard, where each of the stages should be given equal weight. There should be evidence in each of these stages in the DT books, which should also develop to show clear progression across the key stages as they are passed up through each year group.

In KS1 this looks like:

Design:

• Design should be rooted in real life, relevant contexts to give meaning to the learning.

• Planned through appropriate formats: drawing, templates, talking and mock-ups.

Make:

• Children should be given a range of tools and equipment for their projects to choose from to perform practical tasks. For, cutting, shaping, joining, and finishing with some degree of accuracy

• Children should use a wide range of materials and components; textiles, construction equipment and ingredients.

Evaluate:

• Evaluate existing products.

• Evaluate their own products against design criteria.

In KS2 this looks like:

Design:

• Rooted in real life, relevant contexts to give meaning to the learning.

• Researched designs based on functional, appealing products with purpose.

• Planned by appropriate methods; annotated sketches, cross-sectional diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer aided design.

Make:

• Children can select from a wider range of tools than KS1. For, cutting, shaping, joining, and finishing with a good degree of accuracy

• Children should use from and select a wider range of materials and components; textiles, construction equipment and ingredients.

Evaluate:

• Evaluations should be in comparison to existing products.

• Children should evaluate against a set of design criteria.

• Children should understand how key events and individuals have helped shape design and technology globally – products are in context

Progression booklets will be shared with the children at the beginning of their lesson to enable them to revisit their prior learning, be confident articulating their new learning and see what their learning will take them as they move through school. This will develop a knowledge of the purpose of their learning and where they sit upon their journey.

Impact

We ensure the children:

• develop the creative, technical, and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world

• build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users and critique, evaluate, and test their ideas and products and the work of others

• understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook. Children will design and make a range of products. A good quality finish will be expected in all design and activities made appropriate to the age and ability of the child

We want our children to develop:

• An excellent attitude to learning and independent working.

• The ability to use time efficiently and work constructively and productively with others.

• The ability to carry out thorough research, show initiative and ask questions to develop an exceptionally detailed knowledge of users’ needs.

• The ability to act as responsible designers and makers, working ethically, using finite materials carefully and working safely.

• A thorough knowledge of which tools, equipment, and materials to use to make their products.

• The ability to apply mathematical knowledge and skills accurately. The ability to manage risks exceptionally well to manufacture products safely and hygienically.

• A passion for the subject

Assessment will take place against ‘I can statements’ at the end of each academic year. This assessment will be against each area of design and technology learning.

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Can you eat healthily and save money? You bet your bottom dollar you can! Here are 20 tips from the NHS to help you have your (low-fat) cake and eat it.

If cost is discouraging you from trying to make changes to your and your family's diet, read on: healthy eating does not have to cost more.

1. Write a shopping list
2. Waste nothing
3. Eat leftovers for lunch
4. Buy frozen
5. Try cheaper brands
6. Eat more veg
7. Cook with pulses.
8. Freeze leftover bread
9. Know your kitchen Cupboard
10. Buy cheaper cuts of Meat
11. Look up cheap recipes
12. Eat smaller portions
13. Cook from scratch
14. Buy chicken whole
15. Compare pre-packed with loose - Check the price per weight (for example, £/kg).
16. Cut down on luxuries
17. Beware of BOGOF offers - Special discounts,
18. Toddlers eat the same
19. Shop online
20. Shop during the 'happy hour' - Most supermarkets discount fresh items towards the end of the day.

Check out the link for full details
www.nhs.uk/live-well/eat-well/20-tips-to-eat-well-for-less/
... See MoreSee Less

Can you eat healthily and save money? You bet your bottom dollar you can! Here are 20 tips from the NHS to help you have your (low-fat) cake and eat it.
If cost is discouraging you from trying to make changes to your and your familys diet, read on: healthy eating does not have to cost more.
1. Write a shopping list 
2. Waste nothing
3. Eat leftovers for lunch
4. Buy frozen
5. Try cheaper brands
6. Eat more veg
7. Cook with pulses.
8. Freeze leftover bread
9. Know your kitchen Cupboard
10. Buy cheaper cuts of Meat 
11. Look up cheap recipes
12. Eat smaller portions
13. Cook from scratch
14. Buy chicken whole
15. Compare pre-packed with loose - Check the price per weight (for example, £/kg). 
16. Cut down on luxuries
17. Beware of BOGOF offers - Special discounts, 
18. Toddlers eat the same
19. Shop online
20. Shop during the happy hour - Most supermarkets discount fresh items towards the end of the day.
Check out the link for full details 
https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/eat-well/20-tips-to-eat-well-for-less/

HOW MUCH DO YOU KNOW ABOUT ONLINE GAMING - IN PARTICULAR IN-APP SPENDING? 🎮

Check out this link to find out everything you need to do and how to stop/limit the spending.
www.internetmatters.org/resources/online-money-management-guide/in-game-spending-tips-to-support-...

Many of the games that children play online are free. As adults, we know things are rarely truly free so it’s worth considering whether something is free to access because we are the product, paying with our data, time or attention. One of the real benefits of in-game spending is that most platforms and services will allow parents to exercise a certain amount of control over what their children are able to do. It is possible to limit the types of transactions as well as the amount of money that they are able to spend.

The COVID-19 pandemic has certainly had an impact on online gaming with the popular online gaming platform Steam breaking its own record for the highest number of players playing at the same time on the platform six times during 2020 as reported by Eurogamer. Findings from Barclays Games and Esports report also revealed that the games industry saw the largest increase in spending in 2020, up by 43% compared to 2019.
... See MoreSee Less

HOW MUCH DO YOU KNOW ABOUT ONLINE GAMING - IN PARTICULAR IN-APP SPENDING? 🎮
Check out this link to find out everything you need to do and how to stop/limit the spending.
https://www.internetmatters.org/resources/online-money-management-guide/in-game-spending-tips-to-support-young-people/
Many of the games that children play online are free. As adults, we know things are rarely truly free so it’s worth considering whether something is free to access because we are the product, paying with our data, time or attention.  One of the real benefits of in-game spending is that most platforms and services will allow parents to exercise a certain amount of control over what their children are able to do. It is possible to limit the types of transactions as well as the amount of money that they are able to spend. 
The COVID-19 pandemic has certainly had an impact on online gaming with the popular online gaming platform Steam breaking its own record for the highest number of players playing at the same time on the platform six times during 2020 as reported by Eurogamer. Findings from Barclays Games and Esports report also revealed that the games industry saw the largest increase in spending in 2020, up by 43% compared to 2019.

🚗🚗🚗POLITE REMINDER🚗🚗🚗

Please can we all be mindful of our local residents, when parking to collect or drop off your children (even if it is for just a minute or your not leaving the vehicle) can you NOT park over driveways. This also includes the shared drive/road that goes along the side of our school to the overflow carpark and health centre, we ask you to NOT park anywhere along there or near the bungalow at the bottom as the emergency services needs 100% access to this at all times of the day, everyday.

Thank you
... See MoreSee Less

🚗🚗🚗POLITE REMINDER🚗🚗🚗
Please can we all be mindful of our local residents, when parking to collect or drop off your children (even if it is for just a minute or your not leaving the vehicle) can you NOT park over driveways. This also includes the shared drive/road that goes along the side of our school to the overflow carpark and health centre, we ask you to NOT park anywhere along there or near the bungalow at the bottom as the emergency services needs 100% access to this at all times of the day, everyday.
Thank you
8th March school to re-open to all children - please see the bottom of the page for Covid-19 related information